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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Glenn Greenwald
Guardian Reporter
MSNBCW 06/23/2013
Part 1 of Greenwald and Gregory: Is there additional information he is prepared to leak to bolster his and your claim that he is actually a whistleblower, and not a criminal, responsible for espionage? Grenwald: sure. I think the key definition of whistleblower is somebody who brings to light what political officials do in the dark, that is either deceitful or illegal. In this case, there's a "new York times" article just this morning that describes that one of the revelations
Glenn Greenwald
Guardian Reporter
MSNBCW 06/23/2013
Part 2 of Greenwald and Gregory that he enabled that we reported is that the director of national intelligence, James clapper, went before the US Congress and lied outright when asked whether or not the NSA is collecting any form of data on millions Americans. Director clapper's response was, no, sir. As
David Gregory
MSNBC Moderator of Meet The Press
MSNBCW 06/23/2013
Part 1 Gregory: This (Snowden) is a partisan who is single-handedly deciding to expose programs that there is both support for, and in doing so, illegally. This is more of an agenda, and frankly, there's a lot of concern that one person would take it upon himself to undermine a program that a lot of people believe is actually helpful to national security.
Barton Gellman
Journalist, contributing to the Washington Post
KNTV 08/11/2013
Gregory: Has Edward Snowden won? Has he accomplished what he set out to do, which is not only get a debate going but force change in these programs? Gellman: he has accomplished far more than anyone in his position could have reasonably hoped to have accomplished. And He told me his greatest fear was that he would come out and do this and whole story would be -- you know, roiling around for a day and it would be gone. Now you have president Obama
David Gregory
MSNBC Moderator of Meet The Press
MSNBCW 01/19/2014
Gregory: (Basically the President says) these programs are here to stay. And critics of the speech as i've been reading them, seem to say very little will change. Barton Gellman writes about it in the Washington Post and here’s what he said,
Dianne Feinstein
U.S. Senator (D-CA), Chairman of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
MSNBCW 01/19/2014
Feinstein: I think a lot of the privacy people perhaps don’t understand that we still occupy the role of the great satan. New bombs are being devised. New terrorists are emerging. New groups. Actually, a new level of viciousness. And I think we need to be prepared. I think we need to do it in a way that respects people's privacy rights.
Dianne Feinstein
U.S. Senator (D-CA), Chairman of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
MSNBCW 01/19/2014
Feinstein: When you look at what companies collect, the government does not seem to be a major offender at all. Gregory: But isn't the difference, of course, Chairman, that it's only the government that can deprive you of your liberty. You know, Google or Amazon, you still have to click to acquiesce and not even know they have a lot of that personal information. The government seems to want total awareness. And that's where even in the name of security a lot of critics say sorry, that is an invasion of privacy (and that is going overboard.)
Edward Snowden
Whistleblower
MSNBCW 01/19/2014
Gregory: Edward Snowden himself when he was interviewed in the
Mike Rogers
Representative (R-Mich.), Chair, House Select Committee on Intelligence
MSNBCW 01/19/2014
Rogers: Well first of all, I couldn't disagree more. That's like having the janitor at a bank who figured out how to steal some money deciding matters of high finance. This was a thief who we believe had some help who stole information the vast majority had the nothing to do with privacy. Our army, navy, air force, marines have been incredibly harmed by the data that he has taken with him and we believe now is in the hands of nation states. Gregory: What help did he have? Who helped him do you think in is. Rogers: well, there were certain questions that we have to get answered. Where a, first of all if it was a privacy concern he had, he didn't look for information on the privacy side for americans. He was stealing information that had to do with how we operate overseas to collect information to keep Americans safe. That begs a question. Some of the things he did were beyond his technical capabilities. Raises more questions. How he arranged travel before he left.
Mike Rogers
Representative (R-Mich.), Chair, House Select Committee on Intelligence
MSNBCW 01/19/2014
Rogers: I believe there’s a reason he ended up in the hands, the loving arms of an FSB agent in Moscow. I don’t think that’s a coincidence. Gregory: You think the Russians helped Ed Snowden? Rogers: I believe there's questions to be answer there. I don't think it was a gee whiz luck event that he ended up in Moscow under the handling of the FSB. Gregory: That's a significant development. Rogers: I said we have questions we have to answer. But as somebody who used to do investigations, some of the things we're finding we would call clues that certainly would indicate to me that he had some help and he stole things that had nothing to do with privacy.
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